film photography · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Bear Photo Service Box Camera and Developing Ilford Pan F Plus 50

The Bear Photo Service Camera is a box camera made by Ansco Company in the 1940’s. There isn’t much info out there about this camera, so I have not found a definitive date for this camera. It is based on the Ansco B2 Cadet model, but this version was specially made for the Bear Photo… Continue reading The Bear Photo Service Box Camera and Developing Ilford Pan F Plus 50

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The Kodak Brownie Target Six-20

Not to be confused with the Target Brownie 620 made in 1941, the Kodak Brownie Target Six-20 was made from 1946 until 1952. It has the Art Deco stripe design on the front plate that was common back in the era of skyscrapers. Kodak created the Brownie box camera in 1900 as a way to… Continue reading The Kodak Brownie Target Six-20

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Why do I Shoot with all of these Cameras? – Hoarding VS Enjoyability

Just like one would spread awareness for a disease I feel that my blog reviews and YouTube videos are also a way of spreading awareness for an institution that will eventually die because these cameras will at some point become extinct. I think it’s this knowledge (unless some company decides to start making film cameras again) that makes photographers like me want to collect cameras and shoot with as many as I can, while I still can.

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The Kodak Brownie Target Six-16 with the FAK 616

The Kodak Brownie Target Six-16 is virtually the same as the Kodak Brownie Target Six-20 that I’ve reviewed in the past. They even use the same manual. The only difference is the size of the film it uses. As I mentioned in my article about the six-20, Kodak started making their own film to go… Continue reading The Kodak Brownie Target Six-16 with the FAK 616

film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

the Beacon Two Twenty-Five

Made by Whitehouse Products INC in Brooklyn, NY from 1950 to 1959, the Beacon 225 was named for the 2.25 inch square pictures it takes. Like many cameras made then, it’s made of Bakelite plastic. An old ad stated that it was made of molded shock-resistant plastic from General Electric. When I researched this camera,… Continue reading the Beacon Two Twenty-Five

film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Camera – Flash Model

The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye was made from 1949-1961. It’s made of Bakelite and was designed by Kodaks own designer Arthur Hunt Crapsey Jr. It was one of many easy to use cameras Kodak Eastman made for the everyday person who simply wanted to take snap shots of their everyday life. Upgraded in the 1950’s and… Continue reading Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Camera – Flash Model

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The Argus Argoflex Seventy-Five

The Argoflex Seventy-Five was made by Argus in 1949 until 1964, and there were two versions; the first had the name Argoflex Seventy-Five written on the front and the second had the name Argus Seventy-Five. Later models replaced the words with the number 75. I happen to have one of each of the first two… Continue reading The Argus Argoflex Seventy-Five

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The Anscoflex

The Anscoflex was created in 1954 by Ansco, but designed by an industrial designer named Raymond Loewy. You may know him as the designer of the Shell gas station logo, among others. He had a very impressive design career. Ansco wanted a camera that looked like no other at the time. Raymond was the right… Continue reading The Anscoflex

film photography · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Imperial Satelite 127

The Imperial Satellite 127 was created by the Herbert George Company in Chicago, Illinois. The company changed hands in 1961 and it was renamed to the Imperial Camera Corp. They were one of the first to offer cameras in multiple colors. The Camera As its name suggests, the Imperial Satellite uses 127 roll film and captures… Continue reading Imperial Satelite 127

film photography · How To · opinion · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Mamiya 645 Pro – Finding the right medium format camera

you can’t count out the equipment you use to get the picture you want. Sure, if you know what you’re doing and you have the eye, you can get a picture with a box camera or a digital camera. It doesn’t matter. But you also have to remember that if you’re going to be doing this for more than a couple days on a whim, you want a camera that suits your style, is comfortable for you to work with, and that gives you the features you need to achieve that style.