Box Camera · film photography · Kodak Camera · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Kodak Duaflex

The Kodak Duaflex is a pseudo TLR made by Eastman Kodak from 1947 until 1950 in the US. In the UK they were available from 1949 to 1955. 1952 Australian Ad These cameras were designed for people who didn't want to learn how to use a camera. They just wanted something simple to take snapshots… Continue reading The Kodak Duaflex

film photography · Pentax Camera · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Pentax ME Super – the Camera that Proves Size Isn’t Everything

If you are just starting out in film photography, the Pentax ME Super is a great choice. It is so small you can carry it in your purse or coat jacket. It also has a great blend of automatic and manual features. There is so much packed into such a small body, and yet it… Continue reading The Pentax ME Super – the Camera that Proves Size Isn’t Everything

Box Camera · film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Capitol 120 Box Camera

The Capitol 120 box camera was made by the company Metropolitan Industries in Chicago, Illinois around 1930. It came in two versions: one with a silver faceplate and black letters and one, like mine pictured below, with the black background and white letters. Capitol 120 Box Camera It gets its name from the Capitol building… Continue reading The Capitol 120 Box Camera

film photography · opinion · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Exakta VX1000 – A Left Handers Dream?

Exakta VX1000 The Exakta is an advanced camera made by a Dutch owned factory named Ihagee Kamerawerk located in Germany in 1936, just before world war 2. That sentence right there says a lot about its history all by itself. There were a series of 8 versions throughout its production. The Exaktas continued to be… Continue reading The Exakta VX1000 – A Left Handers Dream?

film photography · photography · Toy Camera · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Holga 120N – Holga Week 2020

A man named Lee Ting-mo, a former employee for Yashica, created the medium format 120 Holga Camera in 1981 in Hong Kong. He wanted to put an affordable camera in the hands of families in China and he chose the 120 medium format because it was the most widely available in china at the time,… Continue reading The Holga 120N – Holga Week 2020

film photography · Nikon Camera · photography · Rangefinder Camera · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Nikon S2 Rangefinder

The Nikon S2 was released in December 1954 at a time when Nikon was struggling to keep up with the Leica M3 Rangefinder. They didn't catch up with Leica until 1957 when they released the SP and then surpassed them with their first SLR the Nikon F. Even with this lag, the Nikon S2 was… Continue reading The Nikon S2 Rangefinder

film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Camera – Flash Model

The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye was made from 1949-1961. It's made of Bakelite and was designed by Kodaks own designer Arthur Hunt Crapsey Jr. It was one of many easy to use cameras Kodak Eastman made for the everyday person who simply wanted to take snap shots of their everyday life.Upgraded in the 1950's and given… Continue reading Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Camera – Flash Model

Canon Camera · film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Canon FTb QL

Ilford HP5 400 The Canon FTb QL is a mechanical 35mm SLR for the advanced amateur photographer. It was released in 1971 at the same time as its Pro brother the F-1 and was preceded by the FT QL. (Check out Jim Greys great review of that camera). The FT uses the FL mount lenses… Continue reading The Canon FTb QL

film photography · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Canon 7 Rangefinder

In 1960, Nikon made the move from rangefinder to SLR along with Zeiss and the Contax. Meanwhile, the Canon 7 rangefinder came out in 1961, with the M39 Leica screw mount lens putting it in direct competition with the Leica M3 at the time. Canon may have seen this as their chance to pull ahead… Continue reading The Canon 7 Rangefinder

film photography · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Imperial Satelite 127

The Imperial Satellite 127 was created by the Herbert George Company in Chicago, Illinois. The company changed hands in 1961 and it was renamed to the Imperial Camera Corp. They were one of the first to offer cameras in multiple colors. The Camera As its name suggests, the Imperial Satellite uses 127 roll film and captures… Continue reading Imperial Satelite 127