film photography · Nikon Camera · photography · Rangefinder Camera · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Nikon S2 Rangefinder

The Nikon S2 was released in December 1954 at a time when Nikon was struggling to keep up with the Leica M3 Rangefinder. They didn't catch up with Leica until 1957 when they released the SP and then surpassed them with their first SLR the Nikon F. Even with this lag, the Nikon S2 was… Continue reading The Nikon S2 Rangefinder

film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Camera – Flash Model

The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye was made from 1949-1961. It's made of Bakelite and was designed by Kodaks own designer Arthur Hunt Crapsey Jr. It was one of many easy to use cameras Kodak Eastman made for the everyday person who simply wanted to take snap shots of their everyday life.Upgraded in the 1950's and given… Continue reading Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Camera – Flash Model

Canon Camera · film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Canon FTb QL

Ilford HP5 400 The Canon FTb QL is a mechanical 35mm SLR for the advanced amateur photographer. It was released in 1971 at the same time as its Pro brother the F-1 and was preceded by the FT QL. (Check out Jim Greys great review of that camera). The FT uses the FL mount lenses… Continue reading The Canon FTb QL

film photography · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Canon 7 Rangefinder

In 1960, Nikon made the move from rangefinder to SLR along with Zeiss and the Contax. Meanwhile, the Canon 7 rangefinder came out in 1961, with the M39 Leica screw mount lens putting it in direct competition with the Leica M3 at the time. Canon may have seen this as their chance to pull ahead… Continue reading The Canon 7 Rangefinder

film photography · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Imperial Satelite 127

The Imperial Satellite 127 was created by the Herbert George Company in Chicago, Illinois. The company changed hands in 1961 and it was renamed to the Imperial Camera Corp. They were one of the first to offer cameras in multiple colors. The Camera As its name suggests, the Imperial Satellite uses 127 roll film and captures… Continue reading Imperial Satelite 127

film photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

the Beacon Two Twenty-Five

Made by Whitehouse Products INC in Brooklyn, NY from 1950 to 1959, the Beacon 225 was named for the 2.25 inch square pictures it takes. Like many cameras made then, it's made of Bakelite plastic. An old ad stated that it was made of molded shock-resistant plastic from General Electric. When I researched this camera,… Continue reading the Beacon Two Twenty-Five

film photography · opinion · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Anscoflex

The Anscoflex was created in 1954 by Ansco, but designed by an industrial designer named Raymond Loewy. You may know him as the designer of the Shell gas station logo, among others. He had a very impressive design career. Ansco wanted a camera that looked like no other at the time. Raymond was the right… Continue reading The Anscoflex

film photography · How To · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Shooting 35mm With My Rolleiflex Automat and the Rolleikin 2 Adapter – Part 2

In my first article on this subject I talked about the specs of my Rolleiflex Automat, and my experiences shooting 35mm film with the Rolleikin 2 installed. In this article, I am going to expand on that by talking more about the adapter and the pictures that can be had with this set-up. The Adapter… Continue reading Shooting 35mm With My Rolleiflex Automat and the Rolleikin 2 Adapter – Part 2

film photography · How To · opinion · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Mamiya 645 Pro – Finding the right medium format camera

you can't count out the equipment you use to get the picture you want. Sure, if you know what you're doing and you have the eye, you can get a picture with a box camera or a digital camera. It doesn't matter. But you also have to remember that if you're going to be doing this for more than a couple days on a whim, you want a camera that suits your style, is comfortable for you to work with, and that gives you the features you need to achieve that style.