film photography · Nikon Camera · photography · Rangefinder Camera · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Nikon S2 Rangefinder

The Nikon S2 was released in December 1954 at a time when Nikon was struggling to keep up with the Leica M3 Rangefinder. They didn't catch up with Leica until 1957 when they released the SP and then surpassed them with their first SLR the Nikon F. Even with this lag, the Nikon S2 was… Continue reading The Nikon S2 Rangefinder

film photography · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Imperial Satelite 127

The Imperial Satellite 127 was created by the Herbert George Company in Chicago, Illinois. The company changed hands in 1961 and it was renamed to the Imperial Camera Corp. They were one of the first to offer cameras in multiple colors. The Camera As its name suggests, the Imperial Satellite uses 127 roll film and captures… Continue reading Imperial Satelite 127

film photography · Photo essay · Vintage Camera Reviews

The Bell & Howell/ Canon Dial 35

I first saw this camera on a vintage camera Facebook page many years ago and I loved the way it looked. I have an affinity for all things from the 1960's so the design of the camera appealed to me. Back then I wasn't shooting with my collection of vintage cameras because film wasn't as readily available as it is becoming today so I had intended to purchase one for display in my cabinet. For some reason I can't remember, it may have been price, I never bought one. Now that I am shooting film in my cameras I decided to revisit this camera.

editorial · film photography · How To · opinion · Photo essay · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

The First Electronically Controlled Camera – the Yashica Electro 35

The Yashica Electro 35 looks like a robot head straight out of a Jetson’s cartoon, but I love that about it.

editorial · opinion · photography · Vintage Camera Reviews

Why do I Shoot with all of these Cameras? – Hoarding VS Enjoyability

Just like one would spread awareness for a disease I feel that my blog reviews and YouTube videos are also a way of spreading awareness for an institution that will eventually die because these cameras will at some point become extinct. I think it’s this knowledge (unless some company decides to start making film cameras again) that makes photographers like me want to collect cameras and shoot with as many as I can, while I still can.